Children of legendary Hull bouncer Harold ‘Adge’ Mullins pay moving tribute

14 May, 2018

Children of legendary Hull bouncer Harold ‘Adge’ Mullins pay moving tribute

The 71-year-old worked at the Cavalier Club and built up a formidable reputation during his time on the doors

The heartbroken children of a popular Hull bouncer have paid tribute to a “generous and gentle giant” after he lost his battle with cancer.

After his condition deteriorated, Harold Mullins – known to many as “Adge” – died surrounded by seven of his eight children on Sunday in Alexandra Court Care Centre in east Hull.

The formidable Hessle Roader, who later moved to north Hull, worked as a trawlerman before building up a reputation as a doorman.

The 71-year-old was most known for working on the doors of Cavalier Club in Endike Lane, among many others, and it was a job he loved doing until he was struck down with nasal cancer two and a half years ago.

His son Darren, 42, said: “My old man was a fighter. I think that is why he was so respected because he was a no-nonsense person but then if you only had £2 he would give you his last penny – he was that sort of man.

‘He was a good dad and very protective of us all’

“He was influential and a legend. I was only a pup when he started on the doors so I don’t recall a lot of it but there was no trouble when he was on the doors. No one messed with him.

“He was a good dad and very protective of us all. I will always remember him as the man who would do anything for anybody.”

Mr Mullins was happily married to his wife Brenda and was left distraught when she died in 2004. However, he continued to man the doors of clubs and enjoy his life until he was diagnosed with nasal cancer.

He had to have an operation to remove his nose and in the past couple of years, his weight dropped considerably to under ten stone.

‘A hero, a gentle giant and a friendly guy’

Mr Mullins’ eldest son Paul, 49, described his dad as a “gentle giant” and said he wants to remember his father the way he was prior to his cancer battle.

“He was a hero,” he said. “I don’t like to remember him as he passed as there was nothing left of him because he was a big friendly guy.

“People looked up to him and respected him and you couldn’t go into a shop or pub without someone saying, ‘how’s your dad?’”

One of Mr Mullins’ other daughters, Vicky Mullins, 40, “adored” her dad and said she “couldn’t have asked for a better father”.

Lana Harrison, 46, Miss Mullins’ sister, remembered her dad’s commanding presence as she admitted that “nobody would mess with him”.

“People tried but they would always come up worse,” Mrs Harrison said.

“It’s an understatement to say I will miss him. He had suffered for two years so we expected it but it didn’t make it any easier.

“He is going to be missed but I hope he is at peace now.”

Ever since Mr Mullins’ wife died over a decade ago, his children have rallied round him to make sure he never felt alone.

However, his daughter Tracy Robinson, 44, went to visit him every day to run errands for him and keep him company.

“He meant the world to me,” she said. “It was hard when he had to go in a home and then he was diagnosed with vascular dementia which was brought on by the stress of the operation on his nose.

“He used to be 27 stone at his heaviest but he went down to about nine stone more or less.

“I don’t know what I will do with myself and it was hard getting up on Monday morning knowing he wasn’t there.”

On behalf of the family, Mrs Robinson thanked staff at Alexandra Court Care Centre for helping their father in the later years of his life.

Source – Hull Daily Mail

 

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